Search Results for *

Displaying 1-15 (15920)

  1. To Kill a Mockingbird

    Character List: To Kill a Mockingbird

    Harper Lee

    Scout (Jean Louise Finch) Narrator of the story. The story takes place from the time Scout is aged 6 to 9, but she tells the story as an adult. Scout is a tomboy who would rather solve problems with her fists than with her head. Throughout the course of the book, Scout comes to a new understanding of human nature, societal expectations, and her own place in the world. Atticus Finch Maycomb attorney and state legislative representative who is assigned to represent Tom Robinson. A widower, Atticus is a single parent to two children: Jem and Scout.

    Literature Notes

  2. To Kill a Mockingbird

    Book Summary: To Kill a Mockingbird

    Harper Lee

    To Kill a Mockingbird is primarily a novel about growing up under extraordinary circumstances in the 1930s in the Southern United States. The story covers a span of three years, during which the main characters undergo significant changes. Scout Finch lives with her brother Jem and their father Atticus in the fictitious town of Maycomb, Alabama. Maycomb is a small, close-knit town, and every family has its social station depending on where they live, who their parents are, and how long their ancestors have lived in Maycomb.

    Literature Notes

  3. To Kill a Mockingbird

    Scout (Jean Louise) Finch: To Kill a Mockingbird

    Harper Lee

    That the young narrator of To Kill a Mockingbird goes by the nickname "Scout" is very appropriate. In the story, Scout functions as both questioner and observer. Scout asks tough questions, certainly questions that aren't "politically correct," but she can ask these questions because she is a child. As a child, Scout doesn't understand the full implication of the things happening around her, making her an objective observer and a reporter in the truest sense. The reader should keep in mind, though, that To Kill a Mockingbird really presents two Scouts: the little girl experiencing the story and the adult Jean Louise who tells the story. The woman relating the story obviously recognizes that her father is exceptional. However, the child Scout complains "Our father didn't do anything . . . he never went hunting, he did not play poker or fish or drink or smoke. He sat in the living room and read." The child Scout marvels that her father knew she was listening to his conversation with ...

    Literature Notes

  4. The Alaska Interior,Into the Wild

    Chapter 1: Into the Wild

    Jon Krakauer

    Summary Outside Fairbanks, Alaska, a truck driver stops for a hitchhiker who introduces himself as Alex (though his real name is Christopher Johnson McCandless). The hitchhiker says he is from South Dakota and requests a ride to Denali National Park. He then tells the driver, an electrician named Jim Gallien, that he wants to "walk deep into the bush and 'live off the land for a few months.'" At first Gallien thinks McCandless is "another delusional visitor to the Alaskan frontier." But during their two-hour drive north, Gallien changes his opinion and comes to regard the young man as intelligent and thoughtful. Gallien recognizes, however, that McCandless lacks the basic necessities for surviving in the Alaskan bush: he has no food except for a 10-pound bag of rice, his hiking boots are not waterproof, and his rifle is too small for the large game he will have to kill in order to survive. Other essentials that McCandless lacks include an ax, snowshoes, and a compass.

    Literature Notes

  5. Romeo and Juliet

    Major Themes: Romeo and Juliet

    William Shakespeare

    Explore the different themes within Shakespeare 's tragic play, Romeo and Juliet . Themes are central to understanding Romeo and Juliet as a play and identifying Shakespeare's social and political commentary.

    Literature Notes

  6. To Kill a Mockingbird

    To Kill a Mockingbird at a Glance: To Kill a Mockingbird

    Harper Lee

    In To Kill a Mockingbird , author Harper Lee uses memorable characters to explore civil rights and racism in the segregated Southern United States of the 1930s. Told through the eyes of Scout Finch , you learn about her father Atticus Finch , an attorney who hopelessly strives to prove the innocence of a black man unjustly accused of rape; and about Boo Radley , a mysterious neighbor who saves Scout and her brother Jem from being killed. Written by: Harper Lee Type of Work: novel Genres: bildungsroman (coming of age novel) ; civil rights movement

    Literature Notes

  7. The Hearth and the Salamander,Fahrenheit 451

    Part 1: Fahrenheit 451

    Ray Bradbury

    Summary In the first part of Fahrenheit 451 , the character Guy Montag, a thirty-year-old fireman in the twenty-fourth century (remember that the novel was written in the early 1950s) is introduced. In this dystopian (dreadful and oppressive) setting, people race "jet cars" down the roads as a way of terminating stress, "parlor walls" are large screens in every home used dually for entertainment and governmental propaganda, and houses have been fireproofed, thus making the job of firemen, as they are commonly known, obsolete. However, firemen have been given a new occupation; they are burners of books and the official censors of the state. As a fireman, Guy Montag is responsible for destroying not only the books he finds, but also the homes in which he finds them. Books are not to be read; they are to be destroyed without question.

    Literature Notes

  8. Romeo and Juliet

    Romeo and Juliet at a Glance: Romeo and Juliet

    William Shakespeare

    In William Shakespeare 's Romeo and Juliet , a long feud between the Montague and Capulet families disrupts the city of Verona and causes tragic results for Romeo and Juliet . Revenge, love, and a secret marriage force the young star-crossed lovers to grow up quickly — and fate causes them to commit suicide in despair. Contrast and conflict are running themes throughout Shakespeare's play, Romeo and Juliet — one of the Bard's most popular romantic tragedies.

    Literature Notes

  9. The Road

    Book Summary: The Road

    Cormac McCarthy

    The novel begins with the man and boy in the woods, the boy asleep, as the two of them are making their journey along the road. The story is set in a post-apocalyptic world, date and place unnamed, though the reader can assume it's somewhere in what was the United States because the man tells the boy that they're walking the "state roads." Neither the man nor the boy is given a name; this anonymity adds to the novel's tone that this could be happening anywhere, to anyone. Stylistically, the writing is very fragmented and sparse from the beginning, which reflects the barren and bleak landscape through which the man and boy are traveling. McCarthy also chooses to use no quotation marks in dialogue and for some contractions, he leaves out the apostrophes. Because this is a post-apocalyptic story, the exemption of these punctuation elements might serve as a way for McCarthy to indicate that in this new world, remnants of the old world — like electricity, running water, and humanity — no...

    Literature Notes

  10. To Kill a Mockingbird

    Jem Finch: To Kill a Mockingbird

    Harper Lee

    Jem ages from 10 to 13 over the course of To Kill a Mockingbird , a period of great change in any child's life. Jem is no exception to this rule. Interestingly, the changes he undergoes are seen from the point-of-view of a younger sister, which gives a unique perspective on his growth. Jem represents the idea of bravery in the novel, and the way that his definition changes over the course of the story is important. The shift that occurs probably has as much to do with age as experience, although the experiences provide a better framework for the reader. When the story begins, Jem's idea of bravery is simply touching the side of the Radley house and then only because "In all his life, Jem had never declined a dare." But as the story progresses, Jem learns about bravery from Atticus facing a mad dog, from Mrs. Dubose's fight with addiction, and from Scout's confrontation with the mob at the jail, among others. And along the way, he grows from a boy who drags his sister along as a ...

    Literature Notes

  11. Romeo and Juliet

    Top 7 Quotes Explained: Romeo and Juliet

    William Shakespeare

    "A plague o' both your houses!" (3.1.104) What does it mean? Tension between the Montague and Capulet families has been mounting until a fight erupts in the streets. Romeo's best friend, Mercutio , goads Tybalt Capulet into a duel. Mercutio is stabbed by Tybalt, who runs away. Mercutio curses both families in his final words, wishing a plague on both families. Mercutio's words foreshadows the loss that both families will soon feel.

    Literature Notes

  12. Romeo and Juliet

    Scene 1: Romeo and Juliet

    William Shakespeare

    Summary The scene opens with a brawl on the streets of Verona between servants from the affluent Montague and Capulet households. While attempting to stop the fight, Benvolio (Romeo's cousin) is drawn into the fray by Tybalt, kinsman of the Capulets. The fight rapidly escalates as more citizens become involved and soon the heads of both households appear on the scene. At last, Prince Escalus arrives and stops the riot, forbidding any further outbreaks of violence on pain of death. After Escalus dismisses both sides, Montague and his wife discuss Romeo's recent melancholy behavior with Benvolio and ask him to discover its cause. They exit as Romeo enters in his sad state — a victim of an unrequited love for the cold and unresponsive Rosaline. Benvolio advises him to forget Rosaline by looking for another, but Romeo insists that this would be impossible.

    Literature Notes

  13. Romeo and Juliet

    Scene 2: Romeo and Juliet

    William Shakespeare

    Summary Romeo stands in the shadows beneath Juliet 's bedroom window. Juliet appears on the balcony and thinking she's alone, reveals in a soliloquy her love for Romeo. She despairs over the feud between the two families and the problems the feud presents. Romeo listens and when Juliet calls on him to "doff" his name, he steps from the darkness saying, "call me but love." After the two exchange expressions of devotion, the Nurse calls Juliet from the balcony. Juliet leaves, but returns momentarily. They agree to marry. Juliet promises to send a messenger the next day so that Romeo can tell her what wedding arrangements he has made. The scene concludes as day breaks and Romeo leaves to seek the advice of Friar Laurence.

    Literature Notes

  14. To Kill a Mockingbird

    Atticus Finch: To Kill a Mockingbird

    Harper Lee

    Atticus represents morality and reason in To Kill a Mockingbird . As a character, Atticus is even-handed throughout the story. He is one of the very few characters who never has to rethink his position on an issue. His parenting style is quite unique in that he treats his children as adults, honestly answering any question they have. He uses all these instances as an opportunity to pass his values on to Scout and Jem. Scout says that "'Do you really think so?' . . . was Atticus' dangerous question" because he delighted in helping people see a situation in a new light. Atticus uses this approach not only with his children, but with all of Maycomb. And yet, for all of his mature treatment of Jem and Scout, he patiently recognizes that they are children and that they will make childish mistakes and assumptions. Ironically, Atticus' one insecurity seems to be in the child-rearing department, and he often defends his ideas about raising children to those more experienced and more ...

    Literature Notes

  15. Anza-Borrego,Into the Wild

    Chapter 6: Into the Wild

    Jon Krakauer

    Summary McCandless sets up camp along the badlands abutting the Salton Sea, not far from a gathering of aging hippies, itinerant and indigent families, nudists, and snowbirds set up in an area they call Oh-My-God Hot Springs. While hitchhiking into town for food and water, he meets Ronald Franz, a retired army veteran who once had a drinking problem. Franz tries to convince McCandless to leave the encampment, which he believes is a bad influence, but the young man replies, "You don't need to worry about me. I have a college education. I'm not destitute. I'm living like this by choice." After a few weeks, Franz drives McCandless to San Diego, where he lives on the streets before leaving for Seattle, jumping trains to get from place to place. Franz next hears from his friend "Alex" via a collect call; McCandless is back in California. Franz buys him a meal at a local steak house, and McCandless stays with him for a day, after which the older man drives him to Grand Junction, Colorado....

    Literature Notes

Back to Top
×
A18ACD436D5A3997E3DA2573E3FD792A